Founded in 2006 in response to dramatic increases in art valuations and a corresponding increase in “grab and run” theft, Art Guard has been working with a wide array of institutions, facilities and private collectors around the world. We’ve been at the forefront of this industry and we’ve seen customers' expectations change, as well as security companies we work with attempting to build relationships with their customers. Doing Something Different Emerging from the slowdown businesses in security are experiencing because of the health crisis will be an opportunity to reset. Even before the crisis customer expectations reached the point when companies that fail to deliver on the promise of seamless multichannel customer interactions were likely to experience negative business outcomes, including a decline in customer loyalty and an erosion of overall brand reputation. Now’s the time to avoid such outcomes by architecting customer service channels according to the benefits for which your company is best suited. In general customers want to interact with companies based on who they are and their willingness to listen. One of our commitments at Art Guard of providing leading edge security solutions led us to express a different type of customer support and personal attention called Devotion. Devotion as a Service Devotion means serving something or someone beyond self. Many will agree with the idea that the process of selling something is an act of service. You serve the other in making the best decision for them, at this point in time – whether that turns out to be a yes or a no. You can take it a step higher than ‘act of service’: make selling an act of devotion. Meaning you devote yourself to serving a buyer as best you can – you devote yourself to giving them the best possible outcome. In other words, you come from the heart, not from your wallet. At Art Guard, our devotion to our customers is one of our core values and it translates into how we do business. As a result, many of our customers have been with us for many years and it has translated into building deep relationships with people who we can count on. Keeping Brand Promises is Profitable We share our commitment to you by suggesting the following ways to look at devotion: 1. Satisfied customers become advocates and evangelists, working like an advance team to sell your products and services before your sales team even knows a buyer is looking. 2. Serving the right customers encourages your ideal prospects to provide high-value referrals, reducing customer acquisition costs while expanding customer lifetime value. 3. A strong customer experience can reduce service requests and support calls, freeing customer-facing resources to provide rapid problem resolution for buyers that really need it. As much as the current climate is a challenge, it’s a good time to hit the pause button and think about how you’ll come out of it with a new commitment to serving your customers.

Devotion to Service, A Path to Market Change

Bill Anderson News

Founded in 2006 in response to dramatic increases in art valuations and a corresponding increase in “grab and run” theft, Art Guard has been working with a wide array of institutions, facilities and private collectors around the world.

We’ve been at the forefront of this industry and we’ve seen customers’ expectations change, as well as security companies we work with attempting to build relationships with their customers.

Doing Something Different

Emerging from the slowdown that businesses in security are experiencing will be an opportunity to reset.

Even before the health crisis customer expectations reached the point when companies that failed to deliver on the promise of seamless, multichannel customer interactions were likely to experience negative business outcomes, including a decline in customer loyalty and an erosion of overall brand reputation.

Now’s the time to avoid such outcomes by architecting customer service channels according to the benefits for which your company is best suited.

In general customers want to interact with companies based on who they are and their willingness to listen.

One of our commitments at Art Guard of providing leading edge security solutions led us to express a different type of customer support and personal attention called Devotion.

Devotion-As-a-Service

Devotion means serving something or someone beyond self. Many will agree with the idea that the process of selling something is an act of service. You serve the other in making the best decision for them, at this point in time – whether that turns out to be a yes or a no.

You can take it a step higher than ‘act of service’: make selling an act of devotion, meaning you devote yourself to serving a buyer as best you can; you devote yourself to giving them the best possible outcome. In other words, you come from the heart, not from your wallet.

At Art Guard, our devotion to our customers is one of our core values and it translates into how we do business.

As a result, many of our customers have been with us for many years and it has translated into building deep relationships with people who we can count on.

Keeping Brand Promises is Profitable

We share our commitment to you by suggesting the following ways to look at devotion:

1. Satisfied customers become advocates and evangelists, working like an advance team to sell your products and services before your sales team even knows a buyer is looking.
2. Serving the right customers encourages your ideal prospects to provide high-value referrals, reducing customer acquisition costs while expanding customer lifetime value.
3. A strong customer experience can reduce service requests and support calls, freeing customer-facing resources to provide rapid problem resolution for buyers that really need it.

As much as the current climate is a challenge, it’s a good time to hit the pause button and think about how you’ll come out of it with a new commitment to serving your customers.